volunteer

Volunteer Opportunities for College Students Available at PCRMC This Fall

Local college students looking for volunteer opportunities are invited to help the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Auxiliary & Volunteer Services Department, Nursing Administration Office and Acute Rehabilitation Unit through two programs this fall. Student volunteers can help PCRMC staff provide non-nursing assistance to patients at PCRMC.

Safe Send-Off

The first way students in area colleges and universities can help is through the Safe Send-Off College Student Volunteer Program, in which volunteers will assist PCRMC staff with safely escorting discharged patients from their room to their ride home. Volunteers will be trained on proper wheelchair procedures.

For students interested in this program, three-hour volunteer shifts need to be filled from 1:30-4:30 pm and 4:30-7:30 pm seven days a week.

Acute Rehab

The second way college students can volunteer at PCRMC this fall is through the Acute Rehab College Student Volunteer Program, in which students will help staff with activities for patients.

Activities may include music, games, crafts and movies. Student volunteers also may spend time talking with and reading to patients or assisting staff with non-nursing errands and duties.

For the Acute Rehab program, three-hour volunteer shifts need to be filled from 4:30-7:30 pm Mondays through Fridays. There are no weekend opportunities for this volunteer program at this time.

How to Apply

College students who want to volunteer for either program must first apply. Applications are due Wednesday, September 5, 2018.

Volunteers also must attend one of two orientations. These orientations have been scheduled for Monday, August 27, 2018, from 1-3 pm or Wednesday, September 5, 2018, from 3-5 pm in Private Dining Room 1 at PCRMC, 1000 West 10th Street, Rolla.

In addition, online learning modules are required prior to volunteering.

Both of these college volunteer programs will start Monday, September 10, 2018.

For a volunteer application or for more information, contact Franz Kindel at 573-458-7553 or franz@maheclibrary.org or visit http://www.pcrmc.com/Career-Opportunities/Volunteer-Opportunities.

Dr Bass Father

PCRMC Family Medicine Physician James Bass, MD, Has Been Serving Patients for Over 35 Years

James Bass, MD, family medicine physician at the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Bass Medical Clinic in Rolla, remembers as a young boy going to his father’s office.

His father, Billy Jack Bass, MD, was a general practitioner in Salem, and Dr. James Bass credits his dad as to how he first became interested in healthcare and medicine.

“I remember him evaluating and treating patients,” Dr. Bass says about his father. “I would watch him, and it was so interesting how he put all the pieces of the puzzle together to arrive at a diagnosis. I decided that I wanted to do the same since I love science and I also enjoy people.”

Dr. Bass graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine in 1979. He completed an internship at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, and later completed his residency training in emergency medicine in Oklahoma City. He is certified by the American Board of General Practice.

He began his career practicing medicine in the emergency room at St. Joseph Hospital in Kansas City. However, after a short time, he decided to focus on family medicine as his specialty. This change allowed Dr. Bass to build relationships with his patients and care for them over the years.

In 1983, Dr. Bass and his wife, Annie, now a local Realtor, moved to Rolla, where he began a private practice with offices in Rolla and Salem, where he grew up and went to high school. After the Salem office closed, he continued to practice medicine in Rolla, offering both inpatient and outpatient care.

In 2013, Dr. Bass joined the PCRMC Medical Group and continues to see patients at the Bass Medical Clinic on Hauck Drive in Rolla. He also offers senior care at two nursing homes in Salem, including the Salem Care Center and Seville Care Center.

Meeting new patients and following up with their care throughout their lives are among the things he enjoys the most about being a family medicine doctor. “The continuity, the relationship and the knowledge of the patient and the family make being a family medicine doctor so special,” Dr. Bass says.

Because Dr. Bass is part of the PCRMC team, his patients have access to a variety of services at PCRMC, including many specialists.

“I’ve been working at the Rolla hospital for years, and I’ve seen it grow,” he says. “It seems we’re always adding new things, and that means patients don’t have to travel far to see a specialist or access quality services.”

Staff at the Bass Medical Clinic describe Dr. Bass as very thorough and straightforward with his patients. In cases where patients need a referral to see a PCRMC specialist, often times, Dr. Bass will personally call the specialist himself to make arrangements.

Since Dr. Bass is a family medicine physician, he sees patients of all ages and with all types of conditions. “I do some pediatric care for children ages 10 and up, and I also do geriatric care for seniors living in nursing homes,” he says.

Dr. Bass offers sports physicals and other general care to patients as well as encourages screenings and other services to prevent illnesses.

“The best health advice I would give my patients is to eat a good diet and get some form of exercise at least four to five times a week,” he says. “Diet and exercise can make all the difference in the world when it comes to your health.”

Dr. Bass can help patients with colds and the flu or more serious diseases, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. In fact, Dr. Bass has a special interest in cardiovascular disease, which includes problems with the heart and blood vessels.

Dr. Bass says PCRMC Cardiologist James Spadaro, MD, was a significant influence on his decision to work at PCRMC. “He has helped me with my own health and education,” Dr. Bass says of Dr. Spadaro.

Dr. Bass has served Rolla and surrounding communities for 35 years. “I like having a job where I still enjoy going into work every day. I like my patients and practice here in Rolla,” Dr. Bass says.

Dr. Bass is accepting new patients at the Bass Medical Clinic, located at 1201 Hauck Drive in Rolla. For more information, visit pcrmc.com, or to make an appointment, call 573-364-8818.

Stroke Award

PCRMC Receives Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. The award recognizes the hospital’s commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

PCRMC earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health, get a follow-up visit scheduled, as well as other care transition interventions.

“Phelps County Regional Medical Center is dedicated to improving the quality of care for our stroke patients by implementing the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke initiative,” said Keri Brookshire-Heavin, senior vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at PCRMC. “The tools and resources provided help us track and measure our success in meeting evidenced-based clinical guidelines developed to improve patient outcomes.”

PCRMC additionally received the association’s Target: StrokeSM Elite award. To qualify for this recognition, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke.

“We are pleased to recognize Phelps County Regional Medical Center for their commitment to stroke care,” said Eric E. Smith, M.D., national chairman of the Get With The Guidelines Steering Committee and an associate professor of neurology at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke every 40 seconds and nearly 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

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About Phelps County Regional Medical Center

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) is one of Missouri’s leading regional referral centers, serving over 200,000 residents in south-central Missouri. PCRMC is a non-tax supported, county-owned, 242-bed hospital with more than 1,800 employees, 100-plus providers and a five-member elected board. PCRMC serves a six-county area, with its main campus located in Rolla, Missouri. PCRMC has clinics in Salem, St. James, Vienna and Waynesville, Missouri.

About Get With The Guidelines®

Get With The Guidelines® is the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s hospital-based quality improvement program that provides hospitals with tools and resources to increase adherence to the latest research-based guidelines. Developed with the goal of saving lives and hastening recovery, Get With The Guidelines has touched the lives of more than 6 million patients since 2001. For more information, visit heart.org.

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PCRMC Nearing Completion of Updates to Operating Rooms

A large renovation project of the surgery unit at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) is expected to be completed by the end of this summer.

PCRMC is partnering with McCarthy for the $4.4 million project to update three operating room suites and the pre-operative and post-operative areas. One of the operating rooms was expanded to make room for the new da Vinci Si surgical system, which uses robotic technology.

The renovations began in July 2017 and include an updated HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) system, better lighting and other upgrades. PCRMC’s new surgery waiting area will be more comforting and accommodating to patients and their families. Upgrades include new furniture as well as areas to charge phones, tablets and laptops.

“The upgrades are meant to make the patient flow seamless and the workflow process more streamlined,” said Jennifer Bechtel, director of surgical services at PCRMC. “This will allow our patient care teams to work much better together.”

“At PCRMC, we are constantly working to improve the patient experience,” says PCRMC Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Jason Shenefield. “We strive for patient-centered care in everything we do.”

language line

PCRMC Partners with LanguageLine Solutions for Interpreter Services

For patients who speak or prefer a language other than English, Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) has free audio and video interpreter services readily available to make sure clear communication occurs between these patients and their care teams.

PCRMC is partnering with LanguageLine Solutions to provide interpreter services for patients who speak foreign languages or patients who have hearing or speech difficulties. PCRMC began using the LanguageLine service on July 2, 2018.

This service offers interpreters for more than 200 languages, including American Sign Language (ASL). Live interpreters who are native speakers of several foreign languages are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

While family members may be present and want to help interpret, the professional LanguageLine interpreters are familiar with medical terms and can easily and objectively explain diagnostic, treatment and care information to patients.

“We’ve had interpreter services for many years at PCRMC,” says Kimberly Williams, MSN, RN, CNL, director of Case Management at PCRMC.

Interpreters helped patients in person or over the phone, but with LanguageLine, patients can see the interpreter they are speaking with in real time.

Before LanguageLine, interpreters often had to travel in person to help a patient at PCRMC, mainly with ASL. Time is crucial, especially in emergencies, so being able to connect to an interpreter quickly via a video chat will save time, Williams says.

With LanguageLine InSight video interpreting, patients with hearing or speech impairments can speak directly to an interpreter within minutes.

“The LanguageLine service will improve the patient experience and better serve our community,” Williams says. “In addition, through the interpreters, providers and nurses can better understand their patients concerns, symptoms and needs.”

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 6.4% of Phelps County residents speak a language other than English at home. The most common foreign languages spoken in Phelps County are Chinese, Arabic and Spanish. Compared to other places, Phelps County also has a relative high number of Thai speakers.

The LanguageLine interpreter service is available on iPads and tablets throughout the PCRMC organization and at all outlying clinics in the communities PCRMC serves. The service also is offered in PCRMC ambulances.

PCRMC staff are trained to help identify patients who need interpreter services, but patients and their families also can request an interpreter.

Williams says the interpreter services are easy to use. Through LanguageLine, PCRMC staff and patients can talk to interpreters by audio or video feed, or both, similar to Skype or FaceTime. Many of the iPads have TruSound cases that are designed to make the sound louder.

LanguageLine also offers a notepad feature for written communication, such as explaining medical records and consent requests.

“This service will greatly improve patient satisfaction and enhance the safety and quality care of patients at PCRMC,” Williams says. “Working with live interpreters will help ensure that patients who are non-native English speakers or who communicate by sign language are receiving the most accurate information while receiving care at PCRMC.”

For more information on interpreter services at PCRMC, please visit pcrmc.com.