Browse Author: Paul Hackbarth

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April is Donate Life Month

April is Donate Life Month, and now is a great time to educate yourself about being an organ or tissue donor and to let others know if you wish to donate.

Did you know that 118,000 men, women and children are currently awaiting lifesaving organ transplants? According to Donate Life America, every 10 minutes, another person is added to the national transplant waiting list.

And sadly, about 8,000 deaths occur every year in the U.S. because organs are not donated in time. That equates to about 22 people who die each day waiting for an organ.

However, if you choose to become an organ donor, you can make a difference. One organ donor can save up to 8 lives. One tissue donor can affect 75 lives, including giving sight to 2 people.

People of all ages and with various medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated.

There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for a donation. The donor family pays only for medical expenses before death and costs associated with funeral arrangements.

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) has an online organ and tissue donor list, courtesy of the PCRMC Auxiliary and Volunteer Services. To visit to list, go to http://www.pcrmc.com/Patients-Visitors/Organ-and-Tissue-Donors.

To learn more or sign up to be an organ or tissue donor, visit www.missouriorgandonor.com or contact PCRMC donor specialist Cindy Butler at cbutler@pcrmc.com or 573-458-7644 or Trish Unger at ungert@pcrmc.com or 573-458-7920.

 

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New Helicopter Service Coming to PCRMC

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) is proud to announce the launch of Phelps Air, a new helicopter serving Rolla, Missouri, and surrounding areas.

PCRMC has partnered with Air Methods, a global leader in emergency air medical services, to provide this new service starting May 1, 2017.

The Bell Helicopter 407 GXP will be housed at the main PCRMC campus in Rolla. The aircraft will have the latest in aviation safety equipment and medical equipment such as on-board oxygen, air, suction, a cardiac monitor/defibrillator, mechanical ventilation and more.

The helicopter base at PCRMC will be staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with four pilots, four paramedics and four flight nurses, who will rotate shifts. There also will be a maintenance crew employed.

A helicopter stationed at PCRMC will allow for timely access to tertiary care for on-scene emergencies and reduce the amount of time it takes to transport patients who need specialized care. This ultimately helps improve patient outcomes and experiences.

Phelps Air will provide a new level of emergency care in the community, according to PCRMC Chief Executive Officer Ed Clayton.

“A helicopter base here at PCRMC to serve our patients is important because a matter of minutes can make a big difference in life-saving situations,” Clayton said. “We’re proud to provide this service to our community.”

“The Phelps Air helicopter will provide better patient safety outcomes and allow for more timely transfers,” said PCRMC Senior Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer Keri Brookshire-Heavin. “We’re partnering with an air medical service provider that has a stellar safety record.”

The partnership between PCRMC and Air Methods is not new. The two organizations already work together, with Air Methods providing staff to help prepare PCRMC patients to be transported.

“Air Methods is proud to partner directly with PCRMC for the launch of the Phelps Air program based at PCRMC,” said Air Methods Regional Vice President Marty Delaney. “We are committed to enhancing the experience and outcome of PCRMC patients and community members through the highest quality of care and industry-leading safety. We appreciate PCRMC’s trust in our organization and look forward to continuing our long-standing relationship with the hospital and its patients.”

Currently, Air Methods, which is based out of Englewood, Colorado, has over 300 air medical bases nationwide. Eight of those bases are located in Missouri.

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PCRMC Now Offering Orthopedics Joint Camp

Do you have an upcoming joint replacement? Are you considering knee or hip surgery? Learn more at the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Orthopedics Joint Camp, which can help you get back to the activities you enjoy as quickly as possible.

The classes, which began in March 2017, are held the second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 5-6:30 p.m. in the Shirley Day Conference Center at the Delbert Day Cancer Institute, 1060 West 10th St., Rolla. PCRMC care staff lead the classes.

With Joint Camp, you will get a comprehensive education detailing what to expect each step of the way for your joint replacement surgery, recovery and rehabilitation. At the PCRMC Joint Camp, you will learn about the following:

• Preparing for your surgery

• Getting the most out of your surgery

• Rehab therapy

During the class, you and your family will be provided with the resources you need to ensure your joint replacement surgery and rehabilitation are positive experiences. In addition, you will receive a booklet to take with you that will give you the knowledge, ability and confidence to properly care for your new joint.

The PCRMC Orthopedics Group comprises talented and skilled physicians, nurses and staff. All of our physicians have advanced training and experience in performing hip, shoulder and knee replacements and utilize the most up-to-date treatments and technology available.

For more information, visit pcrmc.com or call PCRMC Orthopedics at 573-364-5633(KNEE). 

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6 Ways to Lower Your Risks for Colon Cancer

March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month, and according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), approximately 1 in 20 Americans will develop colon cancer at some time during their life. However, there are 6 things you can do to help lower your risk of getting the disease.

Get screened for colon cancer. Colon screenings can often find growths called polyps that can be removed before they become cancer. The ACS recommends you get tested once you turn 50. Talk to your doctor about when you should start getting screenings and which tests are right for you.

Eat vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Diets that include lots of vegetables, fruits and whole grains have been linked to a decreased risk of colon cancer. Eat less red meat, such as beef, pork or lamb, and processed meats, like hot dogs and certain lunch meats, which have been linked to an increased risk of colon cancer.

Get regular exercise. If you are not physically active, you have a greater chance of developing colon cancer. Increasing your activity may help reduce your risk of colon cancer.

Watch your weight. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of getting and dying from colon cancer. Eating healthier and increasing your physical activity can help you control your weight.

Don’t smoke. Long-term smokers are more likely than non-smokers to develop and die from colon cancer.

Limit alcohol. Colon cancer has been linked to heavy drinking. The ACS recommends no more than 2 alcoholic drinks a day for men and 1 alcoholic drink a day for women.

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PCRMC Midwifery Program Offers Options for Expectant Mothers

Whether you are thinking of getting pregnant or already expecting, you may want to consider the midwifery service offered through the Women’s Health Center and Maternity Services at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC).

Heather Wildebrandt, CNM, WHNP, and Karen Ulrich, CNM, MSN, APRN, are part of this innovative program, which has been offered at PCRMC for about a year now.

What exactly is a midwife? There are varying types of midwives, including a lay midwife who is trained as an apprentice, and a certified professional midwife, who receives a formal education program but is limited to only assisting with home births in certain states.

Certified nurse midwives, like Wildebrandt and Ulrich, can practice in all 50 states and are the only type of midwives who can practice within a hospital setting. Certified nurse midwives can help bridge the gap between a home birth and a traditional hospital birth.

Both Wildebrandt and Ulrich were originally nurses who had a passion for women’s health and welcoming babies into this world. They both wanted to further their education, so they decided to complete their training in nurse midwifery to become certified nurse midwives.

As certified nurse midwives, they focus on therapeutic bedside support and high-touch, low-intervention methods. This means working with expectant mothers on increasing physical comfort, such as massages, and helping soon-to-be mothers progress through labor at their own pace. Certified nurse midwives educate mothers on what to expect and anticipated risks.

As certified nurse midwives, Wildebrandt and Ulrich say they try not to rush admitting women into the hospital until they are experiencing active labor, meaning they are 4 to 6 centimeters dilated or contractions have become very close.

They encourage women to walk and move around, not lie in a bed. Anxiety can halt the labor and birthing process, according to Wildebrandt and Ulrich.

In addition to pregnancies, certified nurse midwives help care for women during the postpartum periods as well as throughout their reproductive years. They can perform well-woman exams, discuss contraceptive needs and assist with any post-menopausal conditions.

PCRMC certified nurse midwives can see patients at the main PCRMC campus in Rolla or the Waynesville Medical Plaza.

For more information about midwifery or the PCRMC Women’s Health Center and Maternity Services, please call 573-426-2229 (BABY).