Browse Category: Wellness

Rehab Luncheon 003

PCRMC Celebrates National Rehabilitation Week

To celebrate National Rehabilitation Week, Sept. 18-24, a luncheon was held at Salem Avenue Baptist Church in Rolla on Sept. 22 for patients who had an acute rehab stay at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC).

About 40 patients who received rehabilitation services during 2015 and 2016 attended this year’s event.  

Kindred therapy staff for the rehab unit at PCRMC served chicken, sides, desserts and drinks to the patients, while they were entertained by a local trio of musicians.

According to Amy Robnett, acute rehab program director, “The event offers a chance for patients to come back and visit with other patients as well as see their therapists who helped them to regain their independence and return to the community.”

Robnett said she enjoys seeing the improvements that patients have made.

Phil Cox, PCRMC chaplain, led a prayer before the meal, and attendees heard from several speakers.

Cameron Hance, annual giving coordinator with the Phelps County Regional Health Care Foundation, spoke about the Foundation and its programs.

Attendees also heard from Rolla Fire Chief Ron Smith, with the City of Rolla Fire and Rescue, who discussed fire safety, and Cpl. Steve Gray, with the Rolla Police Department, who talked about fraud and scams.

There also were door prizes and other giveaways. Jerry Rosa, Don Davis and Bill Pilliard played music during the luncheon.

Kindred offers acute inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient rehabilitation in Rolla and Waynesville as well as in the transitional care unit and acute rehab unit and is served by 50 staff members.

For more information about Kindred therapy services, or the inpatient rehabilitation unit at PCRMC, call 573-458-7885.

Ed Clayton, PCRMC chief executive officer, met with officials from Saving Sight Monday, Sept. 12, to dedicate a rose in honor of the hospital’s eye donors that will be carried on the 14th annual Donate Life Rose Parade float in January 2017.

Eye Donors from PCRMC to Be Honored at Rose Parade

Last year, 19 heroes from Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) gave the gift of sight to those at risk of going blind by donating their eye tissue for sight-saving corneal transplants.

Saving Sight, a regional nonprofit organization, coordinated the eye donation process for those donors and is working with PCRMC to honor their gifts on a national stage during the 128th Rose Parade to be broadcast around the world from Pasadena, California, on Jan. 2, 2017.

Ed Clayton, PCRMC chief executive officer, met with officials from Saving Sight on Sept. 12 to dedicate a rose in honor of the hospital’s eye donors that will be carried on the 14th annual Donate Life Rose Parade float in January. Clayton signed a vial with a personal message from the hospital in memory of the hospital’s eye donors.

In January, the vial will carry a white Akito rose on the Rose Parade float to honor the donors and help spread the simple, life-giving message that eye, organ and tissue donation heals and saves lives.

“It’s an incredible gift these donors make through eye donation,” said Saving Sight Chief Executive Officer Tony Bavuso. “We’re excited to work with Phelps County Regional Medical Center to honor that gift by dedicating a rose that will be seen around the world as part of this year’s Tournament of Roses Parade and serve as a testament to the healing power of the gift of sight.”

Across its service region, Saving Sight recovered, processed and placed 3,016 corneas for transplant in 2015. Saving Sight changed the lives of an average of eight people every day through the gift of sight.

For more information on Saving Sight, please visit saving-sight.org.

Stroke banner

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

You don’t need super powers to be a stroke hero; you just need to know how to spot a stroke F.A.S.T. When it comes to stroke, every second counts! Nearly 2 million brain cells die each minute a stroke remains untreated. This is why rapid access to medical treatment often makes the difference between full recovery and permanent disability. Learn how to identify the warning signs of stroke using the acronym F.A.S.T:

  • Face drooping
  • Arm weakness
  • Speech difficulty
  • Time to call 9-1-1

Knowing and sharing F.A.S.T. not only makes you a stroke hero, but it provides stroke survivors with an opportunity to retain quality of life. Follow other stroke heroes across the nation by learning F.A.S.T. and telling your friends and loved ones. Your quick actions can help save a life!

To learn more about how you can be a stroke hero, please visit www.StrokeAssociation.org/StrokeHero.

Donate Life Month - Blog

April is National Donate Life Month!

April is National Donate Life Month (NDLM), a month to celebrate those who have received transplants, to recognize those who continue to wait, to honor donors and donor families and to thank registered donors for giving hope.

An estimated 122,000 men, women and children in the United States are currently awaiting lifesaving transplants, and another person is added to the national transplant waiting list every 10 minutes. You can help by registering to be an organ and tissue donor. A single donor can save the lives of up to 8 people and help more than 50 others.

People of all ages and medical histories can be potential donors. Your medical condition and circumstances of your death will determine what organs and tissues can be donated. The important thing right now is to make the decision to be a donor and register your decision.

You can sign up to be an organ donor in Missouri by taking the following steps to ensure your life-saving decision is honored:

  • Make a decision about organ and tissue donation;
  • Join the Missouri organ and tissue donor registry;
  • Inform your family, friends, faith leader and healthcare provider of your decision; and
  • Complete the back of your driver’s license with a permanent marker.

Become an organ donor and help offer countless people the opportunity to live healthy, productive and quality lives. Register today at http://donatelife.net!

Medications

Prevent an Adverse Drug Event by Knowing Your Meds!

Over 60% of adults in the United States older than 65 years old take at least 5 medications each week; 15% of people 65 years or older take at least 10 medications each week. An up-to-date medication list provides real-time information to healthcare providers for routine visits as well as emergencies, when the person might be physically unable to vocalize what medications he or she takes.

Patients should know the following about the medications they take:
• Name
• Strength
• Dose
• Frequency
• Last date and time taken

Medication reconciliation is a process that reduces medication errors like omissions, duplications, dosing
errors or drug interactions. One of the easiest ways to keep up-to-date on medication is to keep a record or a list in a wallet, or to take a picture of the medication list and have it available on a cell phone as an
image for easy reference.

To print a personal Medication Record, please visit http://www.wapatientsafety.org/downloads/My-Medication-record.pdf.