Browse Tag: Delbert Day Cancer Institute

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Waynesville Students Learn About Oncology at DDCI

Physicians, nurses and staff from the PCRMC Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI) hosted 14 students interested in pursuing careers in the healthcare field on Tuesday, December 19th.

The students are enrolled in the Career Embedded Medical Studies class at Waynesville High School. Along with their teacher, Megan Callis, the students got a firsthand look at the types of careers required in an oncology setting.

The students received a tour of the DDCI and listened to presentations from DDCI physicians, nurses and staff. All presenters explained their job functions, the educational requirements, specific oncology training and the professional outlook, or future demand, for their jobs.

“The goal of the visit was to help local students understand there are many career paths available in healthcare and each of these fields are important in the care of our patients,” said DDCI Director Jeremy Stinson.

DDCI Medical Director and Radiation Oncologist Christopher Spencer, MD, echoed Stinson’s sentiments. “All the people who work here are important, from the physicians, to the nurses to the staff,” he said. “We approach everything as a team effort, because we know that each member of our staff makes a huge impact on our patients’ lives.”

bells of hope

Bells of Hope Unveiled at PCRMC Delbert Day Cancer Institute

The Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation unveiled two new Bells of Hope at the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI) on Thursday evening, August 31, 2017.

These brass bells will be rung by cancer patients to signify and celebrate the completion of their treatment.

The Mo-Sci Corporation sponsored both bells. One of the bells is located in Radiation Oncology and is dedicated to Karen Davis. The other bell is located in Medical Oncology and is dedicated to Lana Van Doren.

Both Davis and Van Doren were the first to ring their respective bells after they were unveiled. Ted Day, CEO of Mo-Sci, unveiled the bell honoring Van Doren. Ted Day’s wife, Kim, unveiled the bell honoring, Davis, who is her mother.

PCRMC CEO Ed Clayton says these bells enhance the patient experience. Christopher Spencer, MD, medical director of the DDCI says hearing the bells also inspires hope for other patients and motivates caregivers.

PCRMC Pastoral Care Director Phil Cox recited a prayer before the unveilings.

The bells are attached to plaques that each say “Ring this bell / Three times well / Its toll to clearly say / My treatment’s done / This course is run / And I am on my way!”

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Clinical Trials Day Honors Clinical Research Professionals

Did you know that cancer patients at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) can participate in clinical research trials?

Patients at PCRMC’s Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI) have access to national clinical trials through the health organization’s affiliation with Cancer Research for the Ozarks.

As an affiliate member of the National Cancer Institute’s Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), the DDCI is able to access a wide variety of trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

By having patients take part in these research trials, PCRMC has the ability to provide the highest standard of care and help shape the future of cancer treatment globally.

Clinical Trials Day is being celebrated May 19 this year, and the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) uses this day to raise awareness about clinical trials and honor clinical research professionals by recognizing their contributions to public health and medical progress.

At the DDCI, Christopher Spencer, MD, director of radiation oncology, as well as Stephen Toothaker, MD, and Tezo Karedan, MD, both medical oncologists and hematologists, are research investigators and work with patients in clinical trials. Linda Schumacher and Janette Richards are both oncology research nurses at the DDCI. Schumacher is certified through ACRP as a Certified Clinical Research Coordinator, and Richards is a candidate for certification in the spring of 2018.

“The DDCI offers Phase 3 national clinical trials,” says Dr. Spencer. In Phase 3 trials, a drug or treatment is given to large groups of people to confirm its effectiveness, monitor side effects, compare it to commonly used treatments and collect information that will allow the drug or treatment to be used safely.

These clinical trials benefit patients by providing them access to promising new treatment options that are often not available otherwise. In some cases, participants in the clinical trials may be the first to benefit from the new treatments or therapies being studied.

Most of the cancer treatments available today are the result of a clinical research trial. Participation in cancer research is voluntary.

Clinical Trials Day is held on or around May 20 each year to recognize the day that James Lind started what is often considered the first randomized clinical trial aboard a ship.

Lind hypothesized that scurvy could be cured through the introduction of acids to the body, and so on May 20, 1747, he recruited 12 men for a “fair test.” He noticed that citrus fruits helped those who suffered from scurvy. His design of a trial is believed to have inspired future clinical trial designs.

Lorie Bourne

PCRMC’s Lorie Bourne Named Outstanding Dietitian of the Year

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) dietitian Lorie Bourne, MS, RD, LD, CNSC, has been named the recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Dietitian of the Year award by the Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Bourne has been employed as a dietitian with PCRMC for 10 years. She currently serves as the dietitian for the Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI), working with cancer patients and survivors.

The Outstanding Dietitian of the Year award recognizes the professional contributions of experienced dietitians in the Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Dietitians are nominated by their peers for this award, and an awards committee reviews all of the nominees before choosing the winner.

“I was humbled to learn that I had received this recognition,” Bourne said. “I am very grateful to be honored by my colleagues.”

Bourne is currently the president of the Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for 2016-2017. She has served on the Missouri Academy’s executive committee for the past 10 years.

As a dietitian with the DDCI, Bourne helps patients manage the side effects of their treatments, such as nausea, poor appetite and weight loss. In some cases, she assists patients with feeding tubes. Additionally, Bourne offers tips for nutritious diets and speaks to support groups about healthy eating.

Before working at the DDCI, Bourne was a clinical dietitian with PCRMC’s food service department, working as an inpatient dietitian primarily in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and the Medical Oncology Unit.

To be considered for this award, a dietitian must be a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for at least 10 years, be an active participant in the academy’s national, state or district associations and have not previously been selected for this honor. Nominees for this award also must show that they have expanded nutrition services to the public through innovative channels, completed academic research or provided leadership in the academy’s associations and made other significant contributions to the profession.

Bourne will receive her award during the Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Conference on Saturday, April 1, 2017, in Columbia, Missouri.

PCRMC Valet blog

Valet Service Now Offered at Delbert Day Cancer Institute, Medical Office Building

Even before patients step inside the Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI), Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) tries to make their experience better as they drive up to the building.

With the opening of the DDCI came a free valet service available to patients along with their families, guests and visitors. PCRMC has partnered with Towne Park for the service.

Rob Koppenhoefer, account manager with Towne Park, said he and four guest service associates provide the valet service, which is available Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the DDCI and the Medical Office Building.

A patient or guest who wants to use the valet service can drive up to the buildings, and a guest service associate will give the driver a valet slip before parking his or her vehicle.

The driver then holds onto the slip and once his or her appointment or visit is finished, the driver gives the valet slip to the guest service associate, who will bring the parked vehicle back to the driver.

Koppenhoefer and the guest service associates also assist patients and guests with wheelchairs, walkers and other equipment. They help open doors and direct them to the registration desk or appropriate location.

“On average, we probably open close to 1,000 doors a week and greet about 1,000 people a day,” Koppenhoefer says.

“We just want to brighten people’s days. We are the first and last face they see during their guest experience, so we are always smiling,” Koppenhoefer says.

People may tip the guest service associates, if they wish, but it is not required.

Koppenhoefer says he and the guest service associates have had positive reactions from patients and guests so far. “We’re there to help them,” he says.

The valet service began at the DDCI on January 9, 2017, and at the PCRMC Medical Office Building on December 1, 2016.

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