Browse Tag: general surgery

robotics

PCRMC Begins Offering Robotic-Assisted Surgeries

 

This fall, surgeons at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) began using da Vinci robotics to assist with certain surgeries. In November, Dana Voight, MD, general surgeon at PCRMC, successfully performed three surgeries using the da Vinci Si surgical system.

This system is a new tool at PCRMC that utilizes advanced robotic, computer and optical technologies to assist surgeons with their operations. The technology does not act on its own, and the robotic system’s movements are controlled by surgeons, said Shawn Hodges, administrative director of ancillary services at PCRMC.

“We’ve started with common surgeries, such as gallbladders and hernias,” said Dr. Voight, who was the first surgeon at PCRMC to use robotics in a surgery. However, other physicians and surgeons are starting to use the technology, too. By February or March of 2018, robotic-assisted surgeries are expected to be available in the following PCRMC service lines: general surgery, urology and obstetrics/gynecology.

“General surgery is experiencing a shift to advanced minimally invasive techniques utilizing robotic technology,” said Jennifer Bechtel, director of surgical services at PCRMC. “Robotic surgery is the current standard of care in performing surgical prostate cancer treatments, and much of the gynecological surgical platform and urological procedures are also being performed via robotics.”

PCRMC surgeons have been performing laparoscopic surgeries, which are minimally invasive, for many years. Laparoscopy involves using several small incisions (also known as ports) to perform a surgical procedure rather than making a large incision.

Robotic surgery is a laparoscopic procedure, only with an added layer of technology. “Robotics augments what we already do,” Dr. Voight said.

One of the features of the da Vinci Si surgical system is its high-definition 3D vision capability. This allows the surgeon access to special instruments and computer software to operate with enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control.

According to information from Intuitive Surgical, maker of the da Vinci robotics system, “the 3D-HD image is highly magnified, so your surgeon has a close-up view of the area he or she is operating on.”

Unlike laparoscopic surgeries, the da Vinci instruments have mechanical wrists that bend and rotate to mimic the movements of the human wrist. This lets surgeons make small, precise movements inside patients’ bodies.

“It’s like having an articulating wrist inside that can rotate 360 degrees,” Dr. Voight said.

The robotic system includes a patient cart that has the robot with arms. The physician can control the robot’s arms from a separate surgeon’s console.

Studies of the da Vinci surgical system have shown many benefits compared to open surgery. Some of these include a shorter hospital stay, fewer complications, less blood loss and less need for narcotic pain medicine after the operation.

“There’s potential for less pain and for a faster recovery time,” Dr. Voight said.

Currently, there are robotic programs available at hospitals and medical centers in Springfield, St. Louis, Jefferson City and Columbia. While many of the surgeries that can be performed with the help of robotics already occur at PCRMC, there may be some, such as gynecological procedures, that patients will not have to travel far for anymore.

Robotic surgeries are not for everybody. Patients should talk to their physician to decide if da Vinci surgery is right for them. Only a physician can determine whether an operation using da Vinci robotics is appropriate for a patient’s situation.

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General Surgeon Raman Babayeuski, MD, Joins PCRMC Medical Group

Raman Babayeuski, MD, has recently joined the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Medical Group as a general surgeon.

Dr. Babayeuski earned his medical degree from the Belarusian State Medical University in Belarus. He completed his residency training in general surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas.

He has five years of experience as a surgeon in Belarus. His special interests include minimally invasive abdominal surgery, robotic surgery, vascular surgery, trauma surgery, endocrine surgery (including surgery involving adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands) and surgery for breast cancer patients.

While his mother was a psychiatrist, Dr. Babayeuski actually credits his interest in science and health classes in school as to what led him on the path to become a physician.

The number of different health services available at PCRMC is one of the reasons he chose to practice here. “It’s a big hospital and a busy place,” he says of PCRMC.

As a general surgeon, Dr. Babayeuski says he likes to be able to cure diseases through operations and help his patients live better lives. One of the best health tips he would give his patients is encouraging them to eat healthy and exercise regularly. “A healthy body leads to a healthy spirit,” he says.

Dr. Babayeuski joins fellow PCRMC General Surgeons Matthew Bond, DO; Dana Voight, MD; LeRoy Wombold; DO; and Allison Rowden, PA.

To learn more about Dr. Babayeuski, or any of PCRMC’s general surgeons, please visit pcrmc.com.