Browse Tag: Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation

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5th Annual Superhero 5K Benefits Local Cancer Patients

Phelps County Regional Medi­cal Center (PCRMC) held the 5th Annual Superhero 5K walk/ fun run at Veterans Memorial Park in Rolla in June. This event raises money to help local cancer patients through the Phelps Re­gional Health Care Foundation’s Joy of Caring Cancer Fund.

This year, more than $11,000 was raised for the fund, which provides financial assistance for patients undergoing cancer treat­ments who may have difficulty managing their daily activities due to their cancer diagnosis. This fund assists with prescrip­tion medications, wigs, food sup­plements, mastectomy bras and recovery supplies, rehabilitation and other needs, as identified.

Over 220 runners and walkers of all ages took part in this year’s fun run and walk. Several super­heroes lined the race course to cheer on the participants. Many everyday heroes attended, too, in­cluding deputies with the Phelps County Sheriff’s Department, troopers with the Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop I, firefight­ers with the City of Rolla Fire and Rescue, and EMS crews with PCRMC. The Phelps Air emer­gency medical helicopter also flew in for the event, and attend­ees could meet the flight crew in person.

The Superhero 5K premier spon­sor this year was PCRMC ENT physician Brian Kriete, MD, while PCRMC orthopedic surgeon Alan Heincker, DO, was the award sponsor.

Several other PCRMC providers sponsored the event, including medical oncologist and hema­tologist Tezo Karedan, MD; ENT physician Judyann Kren­ning, MD; OB/GYN physician Beena Green, MD; certified nurse midwives Heather Wildebrandt, WHNP, and Karen Ulrich; psy­chiatrist Vaishali Shah, MD; urologist Geoff Lloyd-Smith, MD; and hospitalist Gerardo Ismael G. Gueco, MD.

Additionally, PCRMC appreci­ates all of the local businesses and community members who sponsored the Superhero 5K. Without them, this event would not be possible.

Once again, there was a bounce house and inflatable slide avail­able for the children to play, and Summertime Sno-Shaved Ice offered snow-cones for sale. MOCA Head Start offered face painting, while Drama Force Pro­ductions presented a short skit for the participants after the race.

Medals were awarded to the top three male and female finishers in various age groups. Participants were encouraged to dress up for the event, and prizes were award­ed for the best superhero cos­tumes. Sunny 104.5 broadcasted live from the event, too.

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3rd Annual Hospice Butterfly Release Set for May 20

Phelps Regional Homecare and Hospice will host the 3rd Annual Hospice Butterfly Release Celebration on Saturday, May 20, 2017, from 2:00-4:00 PM at Huffman’s Flowers of the Field, located at 18148 County Road 1000 in St. James, MO.

This event offers the opportunity to remember our cherished family and friends. Releasing butterflies is a unique way to honor our loved ones because the butterfly symbolizes hope, new life and transformation.

“The Hospice Butterfly Release Celebration honors the memory of those we love and serves as a celebration of life,” says Tara Peters, marketing coordinator for Phelps Regional Homecare.

For $30, participants can release a live butterfly and receive an event T-shirt. The deadline to reserve your butterfly is Friday, May 5, 2017. The afternoon also will include beverages and light snacks.

Proceeds from the butterfly release help relieve the financial burden for those in need when facing end-of-life decisions.

The butterfly release benefits the Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation Hospice Fund, which assists hospice patients and their families with prescription medications, personal bills, food supplements, support services and more.

Phelps Regional Homecare, a division of Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC), serves Phelps, Crawford, Maries, Pulaski and portions of Dent, Gasconade and Texas counties.

Phelps Regional Homecare also is seeking sponsors for the butterfly release. Businesses can choose from various sponsor levels.

For more information, call 573-458-3802, email tpeters@pcrmc.com or visit giving.pcrmc.com.

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9th Annual Heart-2-Heart Luncheon Held

The Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) 2016 Heart-2-Heart luncheon was held Friday, December 2nd, at Matt’s Steakhouse in Rolla. The ninth annual event, presented by PCRMC and Mo-Sci Corporation, offered an opportunity to learn about heart health.

The Heart-2-Heart Committee, chaired by Annette Wells, helps each year to organize the luncheon, where attendees are treated to heart-healthy meals.

This year’s event raised over $32,000 for the Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation’s Heart-2-Heart Fund, which provides education, screenings and access to resources for cardiac care and rehabilitation. The fund also has assisted with providing automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools and financial assistance to people in the community.

Timothy Martin, MD, was the featured speaker at this year’s event. He discussed the risk factors, warning signs, symptoms, diagnosis, procedures and treatments for coronary heart disease. Dr. Martin emphasized the need to raise awareness of coronary heart disease in women.

“While the death rate for coronary heart disease is gradually decreasing in men, it’s steadily rising in women,” Dr. Martin said. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women in the U.S., and prevention is crucial, according to Dr. Martin.

Atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, can cause coronary heart disease or heart attacks.

Many female patients come to the Emergency Department with complaints that are atypical to coronary heart disease, and it’s up to the physicians, clinicians, nurses and other care providers to keep that in mind when diagnosing these women, according to Dr. Martin.

Risk factors of coronary heart disease include smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity. However, for women, the risk may be higher after menopause or if they take certain birth control medications.

Symptoms of coronary heart disease can include chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea and feeling light-headed. Women with pregnancy-related conditions such as pre-eclampsia or gestational diabetes also may be at higher risk.

To prevent coronary heart disease, Dr. Martin advises patients to eat a low-fat protein diet with fruits and vegetables, aim for a BMI (body mass index) of between 18.5 and 24.9 and keep their waist circumference below 35 inches. Lower your calorie intake and exercise more, he recommends, and walk at least 30 minutes a day, preferably after you eat.

In addition to Dr. Martin’s presentation, three local survivors of various heart conditions shared their stories in a video with the attendees. They were Louis Gilbert and Suzanne Jones, both of Rolla, and Dwight Sims, of Dixon.

Several businesses, organizations and individuals donated items for the raffle and silent auction that were held.

Orthopedic Surgeon Alan Heincker, DO, served as the master of ceremonies at the luncheon.

To learn more about heart health or to donate to the Heart-2-Heart Fund, visit pcrmc.com.

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Colton’s Fundraiser Nets $480 for Joy of Caring Cancer Fund

Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) and Colton’s Steak House and Grill in Rolla joined together for a fundraiser for the Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation Joy of Caring Cancer Fund in early October.

Ten percent (10%) of all sales made at the restaurant on Monday, October 3, from 4:30-9 p.m., were donated to the Joy of Caring Cancer Fund. The event raised a total of $480.

The Joy of Caring Cancer Fund offers financial assistance for patients undergoing cancer treatments who may have difficulty managing their daily activities due to their cancer diagnosis.

This fund assists with prescription medications, wigs, food supplements, mastectomy bras and recovery supplies, rehabilitation and other needs, as identified.

 

 

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October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) is encouraging women age 40 and older to get their annual breast cancer screenings.

Every Friday in October, the PCRMC Comprehensive Breast Center is offering free 3-D mammograms to women who are at least age 40 and financially qualify. The Phelps Regional Health Care Foundation’s Breast Center Mammography Fund is covering the cost of 50 3-D mammograms.

The Comprehensive Breast Center has been offering 3-D mammograms since June 2016.

The 3-D mammogram takes about 26 projections of the breast, and PCRMC radiologists can view 1-millimeter slices to get a clearer view of dense breast tissue and detect any abnormalities.

Tiffany Henry, Comprehensive Breast Center coordinator, said there is a 30-40 percent higher detection rate with 3-D mammograms than 2-D mammograms. Mammograms take about 15-20 minutes.

Missouri ranks 42nd in the nation for women getting screening mammograms, Henry noted.

Breast cancer occurs when there is a fast growth of cells in the breasts that turn abnormal and usually cause a lump. Not all cases of breast cancer are alike, and there are different ways to treat breast cancer.

Some of the symptoms of breast cancer may include breast lumps, redness or swelling of the breasts, nipple retraction or nipple discharge, dimpling, changes in the skin of the breast and sometimes pain.

Non-invasive breast cancer occurs if the cell growth stays within the breast lobule or duct, said Carol Walter, nurse navigator with the Delbert Day Cancer Institute (DDCI). Once the growth goes outside that area, it becomes invasive.

 The stages of breast cancer depend on the tumor’s size, how many lymph nodes are affected and whether it has spread to other areas, such as the lungs, liver or bones.

“Don’t be afraid,” Walter advised women who may have concerns about getting mammograms. “So many women put it off because they are afraid of what they might find or that it will hurt.”

Henry recommends that women be self-aware about their breasts and what they normally look and feel like so that if an abnormality occurs, they are more likely to notice it and can let their provider know.

Walter said the older women get, the more likely they may get breast cancer.

To learn more about mammograms, breast self-exams and general breast health, call PCRMC’s Comprehensive Breast Center at 573-458-3100.

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